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PostPosted: 01 Oct 2012, 11:18 
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http://goodfishbadfish.com.au/

An interesting website that covers attributes and appropriate cooking methods for a wide range of species, including many accessible to land based spearo's eg Ab's, Mullet, LJ's, Aus. Salmon, Bream, Squid, Snapper etc.

Also offers alternative species to overfished stocks. Suppose you have a recipe that requires Orange Roughy then Whiting/Bream/Gurnard are suggested as substitutes. This is also helpful as it can be hard to web search recipes for local caught fish, instead you can search for Orange Roughy recipes and use the local substitute.

So if you just notched up a new species and don't know how to cook it, check it out.


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PostPosted: 05 Jun 2013, 10:43 
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Change swordfish or marlin for leatherjacket???

Bluefin tuna for whiting???

What is this crazy talk!

And why does it say to avoid Sea-Cage
farmed Salmon??? Would have thought that would be a good sustainable way to eat fish...


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PostPosted: 05 Jun 2013, 13:25 
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mrlinggis wrote:
And why does it say to avoid Sea-Cage farmed Salmon??? Would have thought that would be a good sustainable way to eat fish...


Confusing hey?

I didn't know either, but have a read of http://goodfishbadfish.com.au/?page_id=1092

Most of the farmed fish are large, predatory species (Tuna, Kingies, Atlantic Salmon, etc). These fish need protein to grow / survive, so to supply this to the fish, they use wild caught fish (such as sardines) ground up into fish meal to feed to the caged fish.

So even though these table fish are farmed, they're being fed vast amounts of (processed) wild caught fish, which means the impact of this farming feed method is just as "bad" as if they were wild caught (so therefore not sustainable?).

That page does talk about alternate protein sources for use in the fish feed, but its an interesting aspect which I honestly had not considered before. Each slice of farmed salmon is really many, many baitfish.

But yeah, I don't know about subbing marlin with LJ or tuna with whiting.... doesn't sound right to me.


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PostPosted: 05 Jun 2013, 14:19 
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Most aquaculture farms use up to 3kg of fishmeal(pilchards, white bait, bluebait, etc) to create 1kg of fish flesh. Salmon industry has got better 1.5:1 due to much negative feedback over years.

Geoff

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PostPosted: 05 Jun 2013, 15:01 
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Yeah I did read that. I thought they would feed them carrots and beans or something...or grains mixed with a little fish for flavour so they would eat it. People say wild fish tastes better i figured that was because of a different diet... but if it's similar it shouldn't be too different.

I have always thought aquaculture was/is a joke. Obviously if you have to buy/catch more weight in feed than the weight of the fish you have grown, it doesn't seem environmentally friendly. Economically only if you grow expensive fish ie tuna/salmon/abalone. But it doesn't make it right taking wild fishes food source to feed to caged ones. Just catch them in the %&^$ing ocean!


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PostPosted: 05 Jun 2013, 15:36 
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mrlinggis wrote:
I have always thought aquaculture was/is a joke. Obviously if you have to buy/catch more weight in feed than the weight of the fish you have grown, it doesn't seem environmentally friendly. Economically only if you grow expensive fish ie tuna/salmon/abalone. But it doesn't make it right taking wild fishes food source to feed to caged ones. Just catch them in the %&^$ing ocean!

Becareful how you come across you may offend someone that may have a studied this area;)

Im no expert but theres def a lot more pros then cons with aquaculture. But to stop it and get fish from the oceans via long lines or nets. Imagine the increase in bycatch, let alone species declining at an even higher rate, damage to habitat, etc
Dont forget aquaculture also repopulates threatened species and increase populations of native and desirable introduced species.

Geoff

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PostPosted: 05 Jun 2013, 16:46 
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Sorry mate. I just call a spade a spade.

I don't think you need to be a genius to understand that if you take all the little baitfish from the ocean, the bigger fish don't have anything to eat... the birds don't have anything and also any other by-catch you speak of.


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PostPosted: 05 Jun 2013, 20:06 
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Interesting discussions about farmed fish Geoff. Just a thought, and correct me if I'm wrong, but surely many species of baitfish feed on weeds or other smaller particles of sea life, therefore can't they be farmed also?

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PostPosted: 05 Jun 2013, 23:51 
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Id like to say yes that you can farm most things but it depends quite a bit on the specific species their lifecycle, migratory patterns, etc. This research will cost you bountiful amounts of money before you even get a yes or no answer to build a site. The research and setup cost factor are bound to put people off and therefore they choose the cheaper option to buy netted baitfish to feed their bigger fish.

As for tuna and salmon aquaculture going forward it is not a sustainable option unless they can find another viable protein source. Good luck in finding a source similar that doesn't have some sort of negative impact on the environment.

Geoff

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PostPosted: 06 Jun 2013, 13:00 
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If the price of fish goes up (of course it will), maybe that will make aquaculture more viable. If alternate feed sources are found.

Why don't they farm weed/algae eating species? Like luderick, they could be fed lettuce... What species eat bull kelp?


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