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 Post subject: Dusky Morwong Fish Curry
PostPosted: 01 May 2013, 21:58 
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I thought I'd share a recipe which will hopefully change some of the opinions of Dusky Morwong. I took inspiration from a Neil Perry recipe and a mates suggestion and overall I was overly happy with the result as was my girlfriend. I'm new to spearing so bagging a 60cm dusky yesterday was great fun and I'd rather not waste the meat. Now I think I'll be targeting them!

FISH PREPARATION
I firstly filleted and skinned the fish, obviously removing all bones. Cut the fish into cubes roughly. The next step may be the most important. Soak the fish in milk for at least half an hour. The casein in the milk will soak up the trimethylamine which is the byproduct of bacteria breaking down the trimethylamine oxide found in ocean food. This causes the fishy smell and taste. Make sure to rinse off the milk with cold water when done.

Next mix a little flour, salt and cayenne pepper to coat the fish. Do this to taste but make sure it is salty. Once coated in the mix deep fry until nice and crispy. I made mine like popcorn chicken from kfc and it was still moist.

CURRY PREPARATION
Add finely chopped ginger, garlic and onion to a frypan with olive oil and sweat on medium heat. Add generous amounts of garam masala, paprika and tumeric powder, also adding a small amount of cumin and cinnamon powder (obviously the raw ingredients may be better plus chilli would be nice). Without burning the spices mix them through then add water or chicken stock. I just used water. Allow this to simmer for 15 minutes as it will bring out the flavour.

FINISHING OFF
Add the fish pieces to the curry and simmer for 5 minutes. It should be thick and full of flavour. At this point add salt to taste. Depending on how much salt you put in the flour coating it's probably best to add a little at a time and taste as you go. Finally add yoghurt and don't be shy with it, and slowly bring it to heat. Squeeze half a lime in (don't forget the lime as it brings it together). Serve on rice and enjoy!

If anyone follows this recipe with dusky morwong (or better regarded fish) I'll challenge them to see if they don't like it!!


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PostPosted: 08 May 2013, 17:32 
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yuck! I will never eat duskie morwong I don't care how much you cover up the awful flavour & texture. Sorry but dusky is just too horrible.


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PostPosted: 08 May 2013, 18:35 
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Until a few years ago I thought the same thing Popeye, now I know there are ways of preparing them that even the fussiest of fish eaters rip into. In fact I reckon they smoke better than a lot of other fish.

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Last edited by Greg on 09 May 2013, 09:28, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: 08 May 2013, 20:03 
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Not having a go at anyone but Ive been seeing an increase in threads about a particular fish that is rated by most people as either average or below average (such as Duskies & stingrays) now getting compliments.

Eat what you like "but realise" that if you didn't put it in curry or add enough asian spices to mask the taste it would most likely taste pretty average.

Even the right brine solutions and good types of wood shavings (used for smoking)can make a Yakka's, slimies, mullet, eel into tasty morsels.

Most Asian restaurants don't use good fish when they are adding fish pieces to a curry or seafood combination dishes. They serve you crap like imported basa and it comes out good most of the time cos of the sauces, spices, etc

End of story

Geoff

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PostPosted: 08 May 2013, 20:12 
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That's true, im sure if you add enough spices and battered a turd you wouldn't even know your chewing on shit :lol:


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PostPosted: 09 May 2013, 02:13 
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Yeah I agree with Greg and Bluegroper. In fact the first time I cooked a younger dusky I caught, I simply coated fillets with flour, shaved parmesan, ground pepper and salt, and grilled them on the BBQ with some oil and butter. They came up a treat and one of the people eating it was really fussy and enjoyed it.

It was the first time I'd eaten dusky and I was surprised when I started reading all over the web and this forum that so many people utterly hated the taste. Perhaps as a plain fillet on their own they might not taste good, but it's a known fact that asian restaurants usually serve mediocre to crap fish and make them taste good as previously stated.

In fact I read an article this summer after having fun catching and dispatching (with many a beer bottle after dispatching the beers into my stomach) many carp from a secret hole. I have never eaten carp I've caught, but I was interested because so many Europeans love them, and in fact I've eaten them at a Chinese restaurant. Probably farmed in tanks but european carp nonetheless, After reading this article I'm wondering if half of the comments about duskys are just about preparation, or perhaps even the differences in taste based on location. I've eaten them from multiple locations and liked them so I don't really know. Anyway the article about the carp is interesting and I suppose if you're not going to spear them, then whatever, but if so why not eat them.

http://www.abc.net.au/local/stories/201 ... 407056.htm

Then again if you prepare them well Popeye and still don't like them then they're probably just not for you! :)

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PostPosted: 09 May 2013, 02:15 
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Greg on another note....do you find that hot smoking or cold smoking gives the best results? Also do you use any particular wood?

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PostPosted: 09 May 2013, 08:04 
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You would probably would stay away from cold smoking duskies. Ive never done it, but the flesh doesnt seem oily enough for that. Hot smoking though.... mmmm.


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PostPosted: 09 May 2013, 11:08 
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I don't have the gear for cold smoking but I think it would work on a lot of fish. I just have a little stainless box from Ray's that I put dried herbs and jasmine tea and such. I find that works better than woodchips. In my smoker dried herbs and spices give a quicker and thicker smoke which allows me to get the fish out quicker and not overcook it.

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PostPosted: 09 May 2013, 13:51 
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Ive got the same thing Greg. There great. Ive started to experiment from using woods shavings such as oak, mesquite and hickory to sweeter flavours such as apple, pear and cherry. Been on many a camping trip. Still going strong after 10+years. Not bad for $40. And even now you still get em for $50. Nothing like smoked fish with a good cold beer.

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PostPosted: 09 May 2013, 13:56 
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Ive got the same thing Greg. There great. Ive started to experiment from using woods shavings such as oak, mesquite and hickory to sweeter flavours such as apple, pear and cherry. Been on many a camping trip. Still going strong after 10+years. Not bad for $40. And even now you still get em for $50. Nothing like smoked fish with a good cold beer.

Geoff

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PostPosted: 09 May 2013, 20:06 
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Thanks guys I'll definitely be pulling my 3+ fish smokers out of storage and trying it out. Don't ask me why I've got three but somehow it happened!

Good advice on the different wood chips and herbs. I use green tea and sugar for red meats sometimes, and of course the usual hickory and mesquite chips but I think I'll experiment a little. I think with the next Aussie Salmon I catch I'll make a cold smoker, but for now I can't wait to try the dusky in a cold smoker. Thankfully there's some in the freezer!

Now I'm thinking I have to pull a wok out and just do it inside as I can't wait to go to the storage facility.

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